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House Democratic Caucus Goes Online

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) will unveil today a new Web site designed to better connect Americans with Democratic Members and party issues.

Pelosi will formally introduce HouseDemocrats.gov to the Democratic Caucus at her leader’s luncheon. The site will be available to the public when it goes live this week, but her office is keeping the details quiet until then.

“The site will send a clear message about our priorities and how our agenda is different from the Republicans’,” said one Democratic leadership aide.

House Republicans have a Web site of their own called GOP.gov, which focuses on party issues, news releases and Member information. The GOP Conference launched the site in January 2000 for the public, media and staff.

Democratic sources said their site will have links to all Member offices, issue information and top news. It will also have an e-mail sign-up section to allow people to get updates on House Democrats’ activities.

The site fits in with Pelosi’s push to improve Democratic outreach and message, Caucus sources said.

“As the leader has said, we never again want to go into an election without the American people understanding what House Democrats stand for and how we differ from Republicans,” said the leadership aide. “This is part of that effort.”

Republicans, however, wondered what took the minority party so long.

“Welcome to the 21st century, House Democrats,” said Greg Crist, spokesman for House Republican Conference Chairwoman Deborah Pryce (Ohio).

Pelosi will run HouseDemocrats.gov out of her office, but in conjunction with Democratic members of the House Administration Committee.

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