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Gretchen Carlson to Testify Before Congress

Ex-Fox anchor will speak on forced arbitration

Gretchen Carlson, center, with her former "Fox & Friends" co-hosts Steve Doocy, left, and Brian Kilmeade, settled with her former employee in September. (Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images file photo)
Gretchen Carlson, center, with her former "Fox & Friends" co-hosts Steve Doocy, left, and Brian Kilmeade, settled with her former employee in September. (Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images file photo)

Ex-Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson says she will testify before Congress after the election.

Time magazine reported on Friday that the former “Fox & Friends” co-host will testify about forced arbitration, which is when companies have employees sign away their rights to litigation and agree to settle employment disputes through arbitration.

Carlson accused and sued Fox News’ former chairman Roger Ailes of sexual harassment in July. She agreed to a $20 million settlement and Ailes left the network after 20 years.

[Harassment, Rape and Donald Trump’s Defense of Roger Ailes]

“A lot of people that I’ve heard from [about being unfairly dismissed] find themselves in the middle of either legal action or, more likely, forced arbitration,” Carlson told Time.

“It is a huge problem. Because it’s secret. And it plays into why we think that we’ve come so far in society and we probably really haven’t — because we don’t hear about it,” Carlson said.

Anti-forced arbitration laws are sponsored by Democratic Sens. Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont and Al Franken of Minnesota.

Carlson currently lives in Greenwich, Connecticut, with two kids and her husband, Casey Close, who is a sports agent. She told Time that since leaving Fox, she goes to a lot more of her children’s sporting events.

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