Campus Notebook: Keeping an eye on Capitol drinking, porn, theft and arrests

Capitol Police end arrest drought

An Architect of the Capitol worker places social distancing marks on the floor in the Senate subway area on Monday, May 4, 2020.  (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)
An Architect of the Capitol worker places social distancing marks on the floor in the Senate subway area on Monday, May 4, 2020. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)
Posted May 8, 2020 at 12:43pm

Drunk driving coverup

An Architect of the Capitol employee, who was arrested for drunk driving and imprisoned for a month, fraudulently used medical leave to cover their missed time at work, an inspector general report found.

The employee, who was not named in the report, was involved in a car accident and served time from Aug. 10 to Sep. 10 in 2019 for driving under the influence of alcohol. On Aug. 30, the employee submitted a doctor’s note to management at the Architect of the Capitol, which said they had been under doctor’s care — incapacitated and unable to work — since Aug. 12.

“During an interview, the AOC employee admitted to their incarceration from August 10 to September 10, 2019, and submitting the Doctor’s note and a certification of health care provider to cover their absences from work,” the report said.

The investigation is closed and management action is pending.

Drinking on the job

An Architect of the Capitol employee has admitted to being under the influence of alcohol at work.

This originated from a manager’s complaint on Oct. 24, 2019, about the employee, in which they alleged that the employee “displayed pornography at work on their personal phone and bragged on separate occasions about having sex with a minor while visiting Central America several years prior.”

The case is closed and management action is pending.

Surfing porn on duty

An Architect of the Capitol employee admitted to the Capitol Police that — while on duty — they had used their personal cell phone to look at pornographic material on the Library of Congress’ guest internet connection. That employee no longer works at the AOC as of Dec. 6, 2019.

What bull float

An Architect of the Capitol employee took a ladder and a bull float home to use for personal use. They returned the ladder when they realized it was broken and returned the bull float — which is a concrete finishing tool valued at $188 — after they finished the personal project.

The Architect of the Capitol inspector general substantiated that the employee used government property for personal use. The complaint originated on Aug. 23, 2019.

The case is closed and management action is pending.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

Wyden’s wife buys stocks

During the month of April and into early May, Nancy Bass-Wyden, who is married to Oregon Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden, bought a wide range of stocks totaling between $714,000 and $1.8 million.

Bass-Wyden bought between $115,000 and $250,000 in Amazon.com Inc., and between $100,000 and $200,000 in The Walt Disney Co. She also bought between $50,000 and $100,000 in four different companies: Alphabet, Inc. (Google’s parent company), Vulcan Materials Co., PayPal Holdings, Inc., and NVIDIA Corp.

No more arrest drought

After a three-week period in which the Capitol Police arrested nobody, the Capitol Police force is back to making arrests. Over the past two weeks, the department made five arrests.

One of those arrests was of a person who was found sleeping in front of the Library of Congress Madison Building on April 23. The Capitol Police officer told the individual “repeatedly” that he could not sleep on there, according to the arrest report. The man did not heed the officer’s orders and “became physically combative and kicking the officers.” That man was charged with lying down on Capitol grounds, assault on a police officer and resisting arrest.

That same day, a man was arrested for carrying a pistol without a license when he was found to have a weapon on him when going through security in the O’Neill House Office Building.