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House appropriators plan June markups on fiscal 2023 bills

Subcommittees could hold markups around mid-June and the full committee could follow toward the end of the month

Appropriators are hoping to reach spending agreements quicker than they did for fiscal 2022.
Appropriators are hoping to reach spending agreements quicker than they did for fiscal 2022. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House Appropriations Committee is tentatively planning to take up its fiscal 2023 spending bills in June, teeing up potential floor votes in July, according to people familiar with the schedule.

Subcommittees would mark up their 12 annual bills from June 13 to June 22. The full committee would hold its markups from June 22 through June 30.

A source familiar with the plans said the dates are tentative and will not be confirmed until an official notice is sent out. A committee spokesperson declined to comment on the schedule.

The top four appropriators in the House and Senate, known as the “four corners,” are expected to meet shortly after the two-week recess this month to begin discussions aimed at reaching a bipartisan agreement on overall discretionary spending levels for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.

President Joe Biden last month submitted a budget request for $813 billion in defense-related spending and about $831 billion in spending on domestic and foreign aid programs.

Also last month, House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., began pushing for appropriators to reach agreement on spending levels as soon as possible.

“It’s still my intention to pass as many appropriations bills through the House of Representatives by the end of June as we can,” Hoyer said. However, since the House is currently scheduled to be in recess except for committee work during the last week of June, it appears more likely that none of the bills would go to the floor until July.

Appropriators are hoping to reach spending agreements quicker than they did for fiscal 2022. A $1.5 trillion omnibus package wasn’t enacted into law until March, more than five months after the current fiscal year began.

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