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Our Texas-size Super Tuesday jamboree

Political Theater, Episode 115

Attendees gather at for the candidate forum and cake auction at the Silver Creek United Methodist Church in Azle, Texas on Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020. Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, and her  primary challanger Chris Putnam spoke at the event.
Attendees gather at for the candidate forum and cake auction at the Silver Creek United Methodist Church in Azle, Texas on Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020. Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, and her primary challanger Chris Putnam spoke at the event. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Super Tuesday! It’s a big deal. And yes, the Democratic presidential primary is getting a lot of attention. But among the 14 states, one territory and Democrats abroad involved in this most super of Tuesdays on March 3, five states are also hosting congressional primaries, accounting for 117 House and Senate primaries and one special election.

We couldn’t go everywhere before the big day, but one place we did go was Texas, sending senior political reporter Bridget Bowman and photo editor Bill Clark to cover the gathering political showdown.

Among the 36 House and one Senate primary contests on Tuesday in the Lone Star State are several that Democrats and Republicans are fiercely competing for and will help determine who is in the majority next year. In 2018, Democrats flipped two GOP seats in Texas, and this time around they are targeting seven.

So Texas is a big deal, as any Texan will tell you. And so is the special election to replace former Rep. Katie Hill in California. And the Alabama Senate GOP primary that will give us an idea about whether Jeff Sessions might return to the chamber. And who will be chosen in some of those slightly un-gerrymandered districts in North Carolina?

Super duper!

Show Notes:

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