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Maybe Gary Johnson Can Get Married Now

Libertarian presidential candidate has been engaged since 2009

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson, shown campaigning in Utah in August, is too busy traveling to get married, his fiancee has said. (George Frey/Getty Images file photo)
Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson, shown campaigning in Utah in August, is too busy traveling to get married, his fiancee has said. (George Frey/Getty Images file photo)

As his presidential campaign flounders, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson will have more time to not marry his fiancee of seven years. 

After entering the race as a popular third-party alternative to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, Johnson’s campaign has been plagued by missteps. His most recent came in an interview with The Guardian when he got into a shouting match with a reporter.

Johnson, a former two-term governor of New Mexico, often sells himself as a free-wheeling libertarian who supports the legalization of marijuana and same-sex marriage while also getting the government out of people’s financial lives.

[Opinion: Voting for Gary Johnson Is About as Sensible as Writing In ‘Puff the Magic Dragon’]

He appears to take a libertarian approach to his private life. He refers to his fiancee Katie Prusack as his “life partner” on one website.

Johnson and Prusack — a realtor in Santa Fe, New Mexico — met in 2008 during a bike race. When they began dating, Johnson gave her a copy of Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged.”

Johnson proposed to Prusack in 2009 at a ski resort in Taos, New Mexico. When asked in 2011 why they hadn’t married yet, Prusack said it was because Johnson was always on the road.

But as his presidential chances diminish, perhaps Johnson will have more time to make wedding plans with Prusack, whom he has called the “cutest 63-year-old girlfriend that has ever walked the planet.”

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