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Trump‘s Lawyer: President Never Asked for Loyalty

‘The Office of the President is entitled to expect loyalty’

Former FBI Director James Comey leaves a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election on June 8, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Former FBI Director James Comey leaves a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election on June 8, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s lawyer said the president never asked James Comey for a loyalty pledge at press conference following the former FBI director’s Thursday testimony to the Senate Intelligence committee.

Marc Kasowitz, Trump’s personal lawyer, contradicted Comey’s testimony. 

“Of course, the Office of the President is entitled to expect loyalty from those who are serving the administration,” Kasowitz said. “It is overwhelmingly clear that there have been and continue to be those in government who continue to undermine this administration with selective and illegal leaks.”

Kasowitz also criticized Comey for leaking and making disclosures to the press about his conversations with Trump, one of which Kasowitz said Comey said was classified.

“We will leave it with the appropriate authorities to determine whether these leaks should be investigated along with all those others being investigated,” Kasowitz said.

Despite Kasowitz’s criticisms, he also said Comey confirmed that Trump was not under personal investigation.

“He also admitted that there is no evidence that a single vote changed as a result of any Russian interference,” Kasowitz said, despite such claims having gone largely undisputed.

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