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Easter Egg roll returns to the White House

Annual celebration held for the first time since 2019

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden look on as "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon as he arrives to read to children during the Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House.
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden look on as "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon as he arrives to read to children during the Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Cold precipitation could not stop the White House Easter Egg Roll, a tradition which returned Monday after being cancelled by the COVID-19 pandemic the last two years.

The event took on an education or “EGGucation” theme, thanks to first lady Jill Biden’s background as a teacher.

Before President Joe Biden and the first lady emerged from the White House joined by two Easter bunnies, Tony Award winner Kristin Chenoweth could be seen reading to one group of children at the South Lawn “reading nook.”

“Welcome to the Easter Egg Roll. The president and I are so excited that you are here. As your first lady and as a teacher, I’ve seen it again and again that learning doesn’t only happen in the classroom,” the first lady said. “There are so many fun opportunities to learn around us every day. And that’s especially true here at the White House.”

Celebrities and popular characters were all around, including Jimmy Fallon, the host of the “Tonight Show” on NBC, who cheered on his daughters in an Easter egg roll race and then joined the president and first lady on stage at the reading nook to read his own children’s book “Nana Loves You More.”

Fallon’s reading came following the Bidens’ reading of “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?”

Among the political attendees on the South Lawn were Secretary of State Antony Blinken, Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona and Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, who is running in the Democratic primary for Senate.

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