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House GOP: Hunter Biden will appear for deposition

The president's son previously defied subpoenas to show up for a closed-door interview with lawmakers

Hunter Biden, left, and his attorney Abbe Lowell attend a House Oversight and Accountability Committee markup last week on whether the House should hold the president's son in contempt of Congress.
Hunter Biden, left, and his attorney Abbe Lowell attend a House Oversight and Accountability Committee markup last week on whether the House should hold the president's son in contempt of Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two key House Republicans on Thursday said Hunter Biden “will appear” for a deposition next month, after two congressional committees recommended the House hold the president’s son in contempt of Congress for flouting subpoenas.

House Oversight and Accountability Chairman James R. Comer, R-Ky., and House Judiciary Chairman Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, issued a joint statement saying Hunter Biden would appear for a deposition on Feb. 28.

“His deposition will come after several interviews with Biden family members and associates. We look forward to Hunter Biden’s testimony,” the two Republicans said.

The announcement did not say whether Hunter Biden had agreed to appear or whether new subpoenas had been issued, as his attorney has said two subpoenas issued last year were “legally invalid.”

The House lawmakers and Hunter Biden have had an extended and contentious clash about under what circumstances the president’s son would answer questions from lawmakers.

House Republicans insisted that Hunter Biden sit for a closed-door deposition, arguing that the setting was in line with committee practice in recent Congresses and allows committees, through direct and cross examination, to thoroughly inspect a topic.

Hunter Biden had sought to give testimony at a public hearing, something his attorney said would prevent selective leaks, manipulated transcripts and one-sided press statements.

Going into this week, House Republicans had previewed possible floor action on two measures that recommended the House hold the Hunter Biden in contempt of Congress, but they halted the plans earlier this week. House Rules Chairman Tom Cole, R-Okla. cited ongoing conversations between lawmakers and attorneys for the president’s son.

House Republicans have been investigating allegations of influence peddling from Hunter Biden when Joe Biden was vice president.

Conservatives have sought for months to link the president with his son’s business dealings, and last year then-Speaker Kevin McCarthy announced an impeachment inquiry against President Joe Biden. So far, no evidence has been publicly released that definitively proves Joe Biden took bribes in exchange for official actions.

In issuing subpoenas to Hunter Biden, the Judiciary and Oversight committees were in part aiming to get testimony as part of the impeachment inquiry. Democrats, meanwhile, have castigated the impeachment investigation as baseless.

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