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No evidence of extraterrestrial technology, report finds

Review encompasses all UAP investigations conducted by the government since 1945, includes materials from archives as well as interviews

The House Intelligence Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence and Counterproliferation Subcommittee conducts a hearing titled “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena” in the Capitol on May 17, 2022.
The House Intelligence Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence and Counterproliferation Subcommittee conducts a hearing titled “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena” in the Capitol on May 17, 2022. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Pentagon office responsible for investigating and analyzing reports of unidentified aerial phenomena has found no evidence of any confirmed sighting of extraterrestrial technology, according to a newly released report.

The Department of Defense last week sent Congress the first volume of the All-Domain Anomaly Resolution Office’s Historical Record report, a requirement lawmakers included in the fiscal 2023 defense policy bill.

Lawmakers established AARO within the fiscal 2022 National Defense Authorization Act to serve as a central office for UAP matters. 

The review encompasses all UAP investigations conducted by the U.S. government since 1945 and includes materials from classified and unclassified archives as well as interviews.

“AARO has approached this project with the widest possible aperture, thoroughly investigating these assertions and claims without any particular pre-conceived conclusion or hypothesis,” said Pentagon Press Secretary Maj. Gen. Pat Ryder in a statement on Friday. 

The AARO review also found no evidence that U.S. government or private companies have access to extraterrestrial technology. According to AARO’s assessment, most UAP sightings are ordinary objects that are misidentified.

Any alleged UAP reverse-engineering programs, where secretive government agencies or private companies use recovered alien spacecraft to recreate their technology, described by individuals interviewed for the report “either do not exist, are misidentified national security programs that are not related to extraterrestrial technology exploitation, or resolve to a disestablished program,” Ryder said. 

Although many UAP reports remain unsolved, AARO believes that most of these cases could be identified and resolved as ordinary objects if better data were available.

In recent years, the Hill has pushed for greater disclosures from DOD on UAPs. For example, the fiscal 2023 NDAA enabled the launch of an AARO website that DOD has said will serve as a “a one-stop shop for all publicly available information” on the topic. 

And the fiscal 2024 NDAA included language to initiate the process of gathering all of the government’s UAP records into a single collection and eventually declassifying each record. 

“They took this very seriously,” Ryder told reporters on Friday. “They followed the evidence wherever it led them, and I think the results speak for itself.”

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