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Higher tariffs on Chinese goods spark call for Congress to intervene

CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 152

U.S. and Chinese flags on a table during a meeting of military leaders in 2014. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi will meet on Saturday in Japan as the U.S. leader tries to revive trade talks and a tariff battle. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/Released)
U.S. and Chinese flags on a table during a meeting of military leaders in 2014. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi will meet on Saturday in Japan as the U.S. leader tries to revive trade talks and a tariff battle. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/Released)

The continuing damage to businesses and farmers from the trade stand off between China and the U.S. is a sign that Congress needs to reinsert itself into the trade policy-making process again, argues Clark Packard, a trade policy counsel at the R Street Institute, a center-right think tank. He warns that boosting tariffs on Chinese imports “has the potential to spiral out of control.” And CQ Roll Call’s Ellyn Ferguson explains where legislation currently pending in Congress stands.

Show Notes:

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