Camp Lejeune tragedy moves closer to justice

Political Theater, Episode 260

Comedian and activist Jon Stewart speaks during a rally on Aug. 1 to call on the Senate to pass a bill to expand health care benefits for veterans sickened due to toxic exposure, including to burn pits, they experienced while deployed. It would also allow victims of poisoning at Camp Lejeune to sue the government for compensation, the subject of this week's Political Theater podcast.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Comedian and activist Jon Stewart speaks during a rally on Aug. 1 to call on the Senate to pass a bill to expand health care benefits for veterans sickened due to toxic exposure, including to burn pits, they experienced while deployed. It would also allow victims of poisoning at Camp Lejeune to sue the government for compensation, the subject of this week's Political Theater podcast. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Posted August 5, 2022 at 9:00am

President Joe Biden will soon sign legislation that will give easier access to health and disability benefits to more than 3.5 million veterans who were exposed to toxic substances on overseas deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan and more. It wasn’t easy to get through Congress. The Senate passed that bill after weeks of delay, and not before high-profile advocacy from comedian Jon Stewart and others. But underneath those bigger headlines, folded into the bill is a provision allowing families poisoned for decades at the Marine Corps' Camp Lejeune to get compensation from the federal government. Todd Ruger, legal affairs editor at CQ Roll Call, discusses this story with Mike Magner, an editor at CQ Roll Call who has followed the stories of families from Camp Lejeune.

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