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What Deb Haaland at Interior means for Native Americans

Political Theater, Episode 192

Deb Haaland made history as one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress and now as the first Native American to run a Cabinet department.
Deb Haaland made history as one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress and now as the first Native American to run a Cabinet department. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Native Americans have long had a contentious relationship with the Interior Department. Now, one of their own is at the helm of it: Deb Haaland, an enrolled member of the Pueblo of Laguna.

It was only in 2018 that the New Mexico Democrat made history as one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress. She’s now the first Native American to head a Cabinet department.

Carla Fredericks, executive director of The Christensen Fund, expert on Indigenous people’s rights and a Native American herself, discusses the significance of Haaland’s stewardship of a department that holds vast sway over land use, energy and Native American issues.

Show Notes:

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