Skip to content

Rick Scott Thinks the Senate Should Work in Washington on Fridays

Florida governor is not the first Senate candidate to make such a plea

Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants the Senate to work on Fridays on Capitol Hill. But his campaign pledge is much easier said than done. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)
Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants the Senate to work on Fridays on Capitol Hill. But his campaign pledge is much easier said than done. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s latest Senate campaign pledge might not be so popular on Capitol Hill.

The Republican, who has been running on a platform highlighting operational changes he would like to see in Washington, on Monday rolled out a proposal for the Senate to perhaps work on Fridays. He also wants a permanent elimination of the August recess (which has already been cancelled for 2018).

“The gridlocks we see every day in Washington show that Congress clearly doesn’t give themselves enough time to get anything done,” Scott said in a statement. “That is why the next proposal of my ‘Make Washington Work’ plan is requiring Congress to put in full-time work in order to receive a full-time salary, just like hard working Americans across the country.”

Scott announced the latest part of his agenda during a stop Monday in Miami-Dade County.

Though it is not clear how many extra Fridays the Senate would actually be in session and voting. That is because the announcement from Scott’s campaign includes a bit of a caveat:

“Governor Scott’s proposal will require members to put in a full work week, whether in Washington or in their districts, in order to keep their annual salary,” the campaign release said.

Generally speaking, senators hold events on Fridays, as well as over the weekend while in their home states.

The other reality is that while Senate Republicans pledged to spend more Fridays in session after regaining the majority, it’s often proven unnecessary.

Senators have rather predictably reached unanimous consent agreements to speed up debate in order to hold the last votes of the week on Thursday afternoons. Those votes would have otherwise taken place on Fridays or Saturdays.

Scott, for his part, is also pushing old favorites like a version of the “No Budget, No Pay” proposal that would bar the payment of congressional salaries if deadlines for adoption of budget resolutions and passage of appropriation bills are missed.

The Florida Senate race, in which is Scott is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Bill; Nelson, is rated as a Toss-up by the Inside Elections with Nathan Gonzales/Roll Call ratings.

“Florida business leaders know that the only way to ensure success is to show up every day, work hard and fight for your company and employees, and we should expect nothing less from our elected officials in Washington,” Scott said Monday.

Recent Stories

Democrats decry ‘very, very harmful’ riders in Legislative Branch bill

Biden welcomes Kenya’s Ruto with talk of business deals and 1,000 candles

Noncitizen voting bill advances as Republicans continue messaging push

At the Races: Don’t call him the next Mitch

Norfolk Southern agrees to $1B in settlements for East Palestine

Justice Department seeks to break up concert giant Live Nation