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White House to release full fiscal 2022 budget request May 27

Budget submission will mark the official start of a summer sprint on infrastructure, appropriations bills

President Joe Biden meets in the Oval Office Thursday with a group of Republican senators including Sen. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, right.
President Joe Biden meets in the Oval Office Thursday with a group of Republican senators including Sen. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, right. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/Pool/Getty Images)

The White House will release its fully fleshed out fiscal 2022 budget request May 27, providing a detailed look at how President Joe Biden wants Congress to address taxes and spending during the next decade.

Office of Management and Budget spokesman Rob Friedlander confirmed the release date. The proposal will officially start the budget and appropriations process, igniting debates about defense spending, entitlement programs, the tax code and dozens of other issues.

The full budget release also signals a finite timeline for bipartisan negotiations over an infrastructure package.

Biden was meeting with top Senate Republicans at the White House on Thursday and wants to work on a bipartisan bill, but the president has said his patience for bipartisan talks isn’t endless. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Wednesday she wants to pass a bill out of the House by the July 4 recess.

That compressed timeline makes reconciliation an option, similar to the process Democrats used earlier this year to pass a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package without GOP votes. Adoption of a budget resolution is needed first, either a revision to the fiscal 2021 budget or a fresh fiscal 2022 budget resolution.

This full budget release follows the release in early April of an outline for the discretionary budget that totaled $1.5 trillion, but that didn’t provide the level of detail included in typical budget requests.

The president’s budget request is normally released the first Monday in February, but first-year administrations typically delay the rollout until later in the spring.

Biden’s full request is significantly later than that of many of his predecessors due to issues during the transition with political appointees in the Trump administration, the stalled confirmation process for the administration’s budget office nominee and the pandemic.

Paul M. Krawzak and Niels Lesniewski contributed to this report.

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