Skip to content

How Black women, America’s invisible ‘saviors,’ can rewrite the narrative

Equal Time Ep. 36

Dr. Inger E. Burnett-Zeigler, associate professor of psychology and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University.
Dr. Inger E. Burnett-Zeigler, associate professor of psychology and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Inger E. Burnett-Zeigler, composite by Chris Hale/ CQ Roll Call)

With Black women rising to prominence in politics, the arts and every field in between, it could be said that it is their moment in history. But dig deeper and the picture is far more nuanced. When expectations are high and mothers still counsel daughters to “work twice as hard” to succeed, what is the cost? Is there enough attention paid to the concerns of Black women all day, every day, and not just when they are called on to “save the world”? And does the current, sometimes toxic political climate create additional stress?

In this episode of Equal Time, host Mary C. Curtis talks with Inger E. Burnett-Zeigler, associate professor of psychology and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University, whose clinical interests include stress management and wellness. Based on her own experience, extensive work and research, she offers advice on resources and services that can help everyone, especially Black women, show up for community and family, while paying attention to their own needs.

Recent Stories

Five races to watch in Pennsylvania primaries on Tuesday

‘You talk too much’— Congressional Hits and Misses

Senators seek changes to spy program reauthorization bill

Editor’s Note: Congress and the coalition-curious

Photos of the week ending April 19, 2024

Rule for emergency aid bill adopted with Democratic support