Skip to content

‘The intrinsic value of whiteness’

A Philadelphia graffiti artist tags an ATM to call out redlining practices, exorbitant fees, and contributions to gentrification in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia.
A Philadelphia graffiti artist tags an ATM to call out redlining practices, exorbitant fees, and contributions to gentrification in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia. (Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The country’s history of redlining, racially restrictive covenants, zoning regulations and more has embedded racism in its housing policies. Simply put, Black communities have been devalued through these policies. Untangling that legacy has proved difficult, especially when some politicians have resisted progress. Mary C. Curtis sits down with Andre M. Perry, author of “Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities,” to discuss how we got here, what the Biden administration is trying to change and what can be done to dismantle housing discrimination.

Show Notes:

Recent Stories

Latest Biden, Harris pitch to Black voters slams Trump in crucial battleground

House Ethics forms subpanel to probe Cuellar’s alleged bribery scheme

Alito rejects requests to step aside from Trump-related cases

Capitol Ink | Aerial assault

Auto parts suppliers fear a crash with shift to EVs

As summer interns descend on the Hill, this resource office is ready