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A good time for a film about ‘Good Trouble’

Political Theater, Episode 129

Georgia Rep. John Lewis stands on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., in between television interviews on Feb. 14, 2015. Lewis was beaten by police on the bridge on "Bloody Sunday" on March 7, 1965, during an attempted march for voting rights from Selma to Montgomery.
Georgia Rep. John Lewis stands on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., in between television interviews on Feb. 14, 2015. Lewis was beaten by police on the bridge on "Bloody Sunday" on March 7, 1965, during an attempted march for voting rights from Selma to Montgomery. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Filmmaker Dawn Porter’s new documentary “John Lewis: Good Trouble” arrives at a time when racial justice is on everyone’s mind.

Protests over the death of George Floyd have broken out in major U.S. cities. Rep. John Lewis’ life has been all about, in his words, getting into the right kind of trouble, good trouble, protesting for civil rights, the right to vote and justice for all.

On the latest Political Theater podcast, Porter discusses how her previous project, the documentary miniseries “Bobby Kennedy for President,” made for an easy segue to a film about Lewis, a friend and contemporary of Kennedy’s in the civil rights era; Lewis’ recent comments about the Floyd protests; and the parallels between 1968, another time of political uncertainty and violence, and 2020.

Show Notes:

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