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CQ Future: Telehealth

Melvin Makhni, MD, spine surgeon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrates a telehealth follow up appointment with Nicole Dane, a patient who recently had motion-sparing fusionless surgery for spinal cord compression neurologic issues (pre-COVID-19) in Boston.
Melvin Makhni, MD, spine surgeon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrates a telehealth follow up appointment with Nicole Dane, a patient who recently had motion-sparing fusionless surgery for spinal cord compression neurologic issues (pre-COVID-19) in Boston. (Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

In this edition of CQ Future, we address how the pandemic has pushed medicine and how it’s practiced into the future. Telehealth, which allows doctors to visit with patients using technology delivered by video or phone, is now being touted as a new way of practicing medicine. But what happens to those who may not have access to technology or its infrastructure? CQ Roll Call sits down with Dr. Julia Arnsten, who has been at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, for nearly 25 years and is director of the Division of General Internal Medicine.

Show Notes:

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