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‘It’s always urgent when it’s about vote, voice and power’

Climate change affects people in a variety of ways, but one way that is often overlooked is the affect climate change has on our ability to vote.
Climate change affects people in a variety of ways, but one way that is often overlooked is the affect climate change has on our ability to vote. (Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Climate change, a major concern of this week’s United Nations General Assembly, affects people across the globe through immigration, food production and the economy, to name a few. But as Ashley K. Shelton tells Mary C. Curtis, climate change is also spurring voter suppression. Shelton, who leads the Power Coalition for Equity and Justice and is a founding member of the Black Southern Women’s Collective, is turning her attention to policies that need to be in place to ensure that Americans disproportionately affected by devastating weather events can fully participate in democracy.

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