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Examining post-Roe concerns over data privacy and health care inequities

Equal Time, Ep. 32

First row from left, Democratic Reps. Nydia Velázquez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Jackie Speier of California, and Carolyn Maloney of New York make their way to the Supreme Court on July 19, 2022 for a sit-it in to protest the Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
First row from left, Democratic Reps. Nydia Velázquez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Jackie Speier of California, and Carolyn Maloney of New York make their way to the Supreme Court on July 19, 2022 for a sit-it in to protest the Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade raised many questions on the future of abortion rights in the United States. With search histories and health apps possibly used for tracking, how can data be protected and kept private? Will the health care outcomes of African-American women, who are already three times more likely to die from a pregnancy-related cause than white women, worsen?

To shed some light on life in this post-Roe world, Equal Time host Mary C. Curtis talks with Amie Stepanovich, vice president for U.S. policy at the Future of Privacy Forum and a nationally recognized expert in domestic surveillance, cybersecurity and privacy law, as well as Kwajelyn Jackson, executive director of the Feminist Women’s Health Center, a nonprofit reproductive health, rights and justice organization based in Atlanta.

Show Notes:

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